July 2013

http://www.startrekmovie.com/

http://www.startrekmovie.com/
Presented By:
Paramount Pictures

Run Time 132.0

Into Darkness continues the universe that director JJ Abrams and costume designer Michael Kaplan started in 2009’s Star Trek, and in my opinion they’re doing a pretty good job. That said, after seeing the film twice, I’m not sure why the opening scenes are in the movie. They have amazing visuals, really cool scenery, and the cast wear some pretty cool looking costumes, especially Zachary Quinto as Spock, but I never quite made the connection with the rest of the story.

The main story involves a very dangerous man from within the Starfleet organization, and the Enterprise crew’s mission to capture him.

As this film is being described as a prequel to the television series, Kaplan has based the Enterprise crew’s costumes on the series, giving them a slight '60s feel, but updating the look with his now iconic Starfleet logo embossed fabrics. In addition to their main uniforms, the crew’s wardrobe is expanded to include shuttle suits, techno-space suits, and wetsuits. These all have either the embossed logo or clear plastic areas where their uniforms are visible. The crew also appear in more formal dress uniforms when attending meetings at Starfleet Headquarters.

For me, and probably for a lot of fashionable fans, Benedict Cumberbatch’s costumes as John Harrison will strike a note of desire – I want his overcoats. They are very mysterious with their funnel collars and very dramatic as he runs through crowds of unsuspecting people. Those crowds, by the way, are very successfully dressed in near-futuristic and/or retro garb without looking too jarring to today’s eye – a very difficult task to accomplish.

Go see this film! It’s entertaining, with lots of humor if you pay attention; it’s got amazing sets and special effects; and everyone is dressed spectacularly. The storyline won’t win a Pulitzer, but as they say, nothing new has been written since Shakespeare. Oh yes, remember to take some tissues with you.

Reviewer: Michael Black, FIDM Museum Coordinator